Collaborative Blogging, Film Reviews

Roxanne, Roxanne, or: Queen of Queens

March Madness continues with a throwback to the ’80s–chunky earrings, high-waisted jeans, and mink coats included.

The Film:

Roxanne, Roxanne

The Premise:

Roxanne Shante, a teen in 1980s Queens, paves the way for women in hip-hop as an overnight rap sensation.

The Ramble:

Initially facing off in rap battles to earn money for her family, Shante is unbeatable by the age of 9.  As she grows into her teens, she continues to compete to support her young sisters and struggling single mom, Peggy.  At least Shante has her bff, Ranita, who is essentially her DJ and hype (wo)man.

A black teen stands at the front of a group of teens as she looks disdainfully at a character off-screen.

Things go from bad to worse when Peggy’s boyfriend runs off with the family’s savings.  Peggy, who has always been hard on Shante, leans on alcohol and bitterness to carry her through.  Shante rarely shows up for school as her focus is on keeping the family afloat.  According to her mom, no school = no home, and Shante must find another place to live before too long.

A teenager in a nice dress sits outside on a bench next to her younger sisters, who are also dressed up.

It’s not long before Shante returns, attempting to make money and keep up with chores.  As she is washing laundry, a neighbor asks her to do a quick recording in his studio.  They do a single take, and history is made–seemingly overnight, Shante is a rap star.

A young woman raps onstage in front of a crowd.

As Shante’s success takes off, she enjoys the ride but makes almost no money from her endeavors.  She happily takes gifts from fans, but has a falling out with her DJ over it.  During this time, Shante’s long-term relationship with the waaaaaaaaaay older Cross begins to unravel as he becomes increasingly abusive.

Will Shante rise above these challenges and find success, peace, or all of the above?

The Rating:

3/5 Pink Panther Heads

Eh, this was a bit of non-story in terms of plot.  Shante’s story is worth telling, but the way it’s told here could be more compelling.  Chanté Adams, Nia Long, and Mahershala Ali all stand out in their roles, though I really hated what a sleaze Cross was.  It’s hard to watch Cross treat Shante so badly for so much of this film.  We don’t ever really get inside of Shante’s head–perhaps as a survival technique, she remains quite aloof.

That being said, I do love the relationship between Shante and her bff, as well as a very brief scene between Shante and her “rival” Sparky D.  I think I could’ve gotten behind this more with a focus on those strong female bonds, but instead we see Shante’s dysfunctional relationships dominate the story.

As a side note, this is also somewhat light on actual rap scenes for a film about a rapper.

Was my blog wife feeling the beat or would she send this one off with a mic drop?  Find out in her review here!

Collaborative Blogging, Film Reviews

Save the Last Dance, or: Kerry Washington, Is That You?!?!

Our 2nd film this month is, purely by coincidence, another one about dance.  And also happens to be the 21st century Dirty Dancing.  Sort of.

The Film:

Save the Last Dance

Where to Watch:

Netflix (US)

The Premise:

A teen grieving the loss of her mother learns about hip-hop, love, and the death of ‘90s fashion.

The Uncondensed Version:

Our film takes us on a train through Chicago with an incredibly moody Sara on the way to live with her dad.  As we learn within the first 5 minutes of this movie, her mother was recently killed in a car accident while trying to make it to Sara’s big Julliard dance audition.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, Sara is incredibly depressed, feels really guilty about insisting her mom be there for the audition, and has lost all interest in ever dancing again.

With the move to her dad’s neighborhood, Sara now attends a predominantly black high school and has a lot of catching up to do.  She immediately makes a bad impression when she gives a really smart, teacher’s pet-type answer only to be corrected by Derek in front of the entire class.

a teen girl wearing overalls holds a lunch tray and textbooks in a school cafeteria
She also thinks it’s a good idea to wear overalls for some reason…

Luckily, Kerry Washington(?!?), aka Chenille, accepts Sara into her friend group and gives her some tips for navigating the cafeteria and other intimidating places.

teenage girls in a school cafeteria look skeptically across the table at a friend
I just had no clue she was in this!  I can’t get over it!

Sara just can’t stop putting her foot in it, though, and calls Derek an asshole before realizing he’s none other than Chenille’s brother.  …Ooops.

Nevertheless, Chenille invites Sara along to a club that evening, where she promises to dance circles around Derek.  Spending time with Chenille, Sara learns her friend is also a new mother who has an on/off relationship with the baby’s father.  Sara also discovers Chenille’s frenemy Nikki used to date Derek and feels really threatened by Sara.

Sara dances really stiffly with Derek, but starts to follow the rhythm a bit more and learn some hip hop moves.  That is, until a fight breaks out and all 3 have to leave the club.

Derek is sort of annoyingly perfect and wants to be a pediatrician.  He is also irritatingly good at listening and drawing out Sara’s secrets.  You’ve ruined me for other men, Derek.  When he learns Sara used to dance but she claims it’s not a big deal, he says the ridiculously sweet line, “I think it is.”

a teenage boy smiles charmingly at a teen girl
Dead. ❤ ❤ ❤

He later surprises Sara with ballet tickets.  Fucking swoon, and I don’t even really like ballet.  After getting Sara to open up about why she doesn’t dance anymore, Derek helps her realize she wants to dance and audition again for Julliard.  Sara insanely does a shitload of ballet while also getting hip hop lessons from Derek, now her boyfriend.

There are now several storylines that begin to intersect and make the rest of this film increasingly melodramatic.

  1. Derek’s friends give him shit about dating Sara. They also think he’s abandoning them and the neighborhood in general and try to get him to seek revenge after a drive-by shooting.
  2. Nikki and Sara finally get into a physical fight, which Sara blames entirely on Nikki. This leads to:
  3. Chenille and Sara having a fight about white privilege, and Chenille claiming Sara shouldn’t be dating Derek.
  4. Sara breaking up with Derek because so many people don’t want to see them together and it’s too hard to keep fighting.
  5. The big audition rolling around, and Sara having no one to support her. …Or does she???
a teenage boy and girl dance together in a club, surrounded by onlookers
Not relevant, but I just wanted to use this screencap.

Okay, this is pretty spoiler-y (though this is an early 2000s teen dance drama, so it ends more or less how you’d expect), but the drama of the film just completely falls apart at the end when Sara is dancing, which contrasts with Derek’s friends being involved in a shoot-out.  Must someone always die when Sara dances?  Is that a sign from the universe or does she have secret dance powers that are beyond her control?

Anyway, Derek shows up at the audition for moral support, telling the judges she’s ready just as she falters.  The drama of this moment is ruined by (1) a judge asking how he got in yet no one actually asking him to leave or doing anything to stop him at all, and (2) Derek jumping onstage to give Sara a pep talk, which apparently crosses the line as a judge interrupts, “We don’t have time for this.”  And there is a slow-mo hug, the most emotionally resonant kind of hug, of course.

The Rating:

3.5/5 Pink Panther Heads

Mostly because our leads are just so damn likeable.  Sean Patrick Thomas and his smile, ungh.

Storyline is a bit meh because it tries to do so much and ends up spreading itself too thin.  It’s refreshing to have a teen dance movie ambitiously cover so much ground in terms of race and privilege, but it does get a bit simplistic at times.  The plot makes it ridiculously convenient for Derek to walk away from the gang and leave his friends behind.  And Nikki is annoyingly one-dimensional, there only to stir up drama.

That being said, the dancing in this is amazing and, despite my cynicism, I admit Derek and Sara were a pretty fucking adorable couple.

Would Christa get it on tonite with this film or crush its little Julliard dreams? (Sorry, not sorry—“Get It on Tonite” stuck in my head after the end of this film.)  Find out by reading her review here!